日々の読書、愛犬たち、翻訳、手芸など


by ars_maki
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<   2011年 03月 ( 6 )   > この月の画像一覧

I returned from Kyoto yesterday.

This time I could visit places in Kytoto, after I had finished
compiling the tanka poems of Grandpa.
I visited the Kyoto National Museum last Saturday.

It was the first day of the exhibition of Hōnen the Great Priest.

Hōnen (May 13, 1133 - February 29, 1212) was the pioneer priest,
who opened the evolutionary era for the history of Japanese Buddism;
it was nobody but Hōnen who said that women were also to be saved--
in former days they had believed that women were, like animals, never
be saved, not being allowed to enter the Nirvana---like Jesus Christ,
he approached those who were avoided and condemned by not only priests
but also by ordinary people.

There have been precious statues, paintings, scrolls. I've found two
of them most remarkable. One of the documents records those names
that were all remembered by Hōnen; tow eminent names are there--Minamoto
Yoritomo and Taira Kiyomori--源頼朝 and 平清守(清盛)---are vertically juxtaposed.

They were mortal foes, each of them leading his own clan.

Kyoto Museum
Kiyomori and Yoritomo
Hōnen 's associates

I went into the restaurant in the museum compound.

Kyoto museum
blissful moments
after quake days

Kyoto has not gone through any quakes.
However, in the days of Hōnen, Kyoto was also hit by quakes,
about which we can read in Kamo no Chyomei.
He writes that on the Kamo bank men came across piles of the dead.

Hōnen tried to do the good to those who were severely accused of
and vehemently disliked: Taira no Shigehira, who put afire on the
temples of Nara. One of the devotees of Hōnen was Kumagai
Naozane. Naozane killed Taira no Atsumori. Atsumori was 17,
as old as his son; Naozane did not want to kill Atsumori. If he had
not, however, somebody else would kill him anyway. So he killed
the youth, who was an excellent player of flute. Naozane fell into
the great remorse; he went to see Hōnen. The priest said that
Naozane would be pardoned and his soul would be saved.
This reminds us of Jesus, who said that he would be with the other
on the cross in Heaven on the day, while the other defyed Jesus
to let them all free.

d0112879_1034523.jpg

Atsumori and Naozane.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-29 20:43 | 季節
http://www.ryoanji.jp/info.html

Please check the photos first!

"Four Accomplishments " the other panels of fusuma-e
or sliding door paintings on special exhibition at
the Abbot's Quarters, which I saw today at Ryoanji Temple.

"Four Accomplishments" refers to the four graceful accomplishments:
playing zither, mastering chess, practising calligraphy and painting.
The special exhibition started last December and lasts until 31st March, 2011.

"Immortals" one of the panels on special exhibition at Ryoani Temple, in Kyoto.
In 1895, in the midst of chaos in the Meiji Era, these sliding doors--fusuma--
were purchased by America. They returned, however, after 115 years, to
their original home, the Abbot's Quyuarters at the Ryoanji Temple.
"Immortals" refers to the paintings that... depict a group of Chinese immortals.

the six panels--
home coming
blossoms smile

琴棋書画春満ちており里帰り
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-29 09:25

Oh, Matsushima !

The Town Matsushima is located just facing the Matsushima---
the cluster of islands,which has been one of the Three
Scenic Beauties of Japan.
The Town Matsuhima--Matsushima Machi--seems to have been
lucky to have all the residents survived except one,
while the town next to Town Matsushimahas lost the lives
of 650 people.
They say or seismological speaking, the gigantic wave of tsunami,
after hitting the islets, must have reached the Town Mastsuhima
with subdued power of destruction.
Some says that the Scenic Beauty of Matsushima had saved them.

From the Museum of Matsushima they led them all the visitors to some hill;
no one became a victim of tsunami.


In Matsushima Zenganji Temple is famous, too, whose wall
cracked because of the earthquake and tsunami.
I've been there once.
I was surprised how close the temple was located to the sea.

http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20110323-00000077-yom-soci.view-000

Speaking of Matsuhima, you must be reminded of the haiku,
which has been attributed to Matsuo Bashyo:
Matsuhima--/Oh Matsushima/Oh Matsushima

When I visited there and saw the beautiful islets by cruising,
I did not cast a doubt about the authenticity of this haiku;
I only believed in the great haijin. However, they say
Bashyo did not write the haiku, but somebody made it up and
claimed it had been attributed to Bashyo!?
Lo and behold!, I firstly felt. However, there have been other
haiku poems attributed to Issa, for example, but also had been
made up by some one else.

When asked by the feudal lord of Kaga or present day Ishikawa Prefecture,
Issa, spitting his saliva onto the ink stone, rubbed the ink stone with
an ink stick and prepared the ink; he used a bamboo bough to write on
a sheet of paper. This was the haiku he dashed;

何のその百万石も笹の露

na-n-no-so-no hiya-ku-ma-n-go-ku-mo sa-sa-no-tu-yu

This was written by Rokuro Nakamura, but has been long
attributed to Issa. When one reads, one can say that
Issa might have written this haiku.


There is one more haiku of Issa that we have taken it granted
that he wrote it, but whose authenticy is now doubted.

water tapping
between birth and death
from bath to bath

To be more literal, however, it should run;

from bath to bath
between birth and death
inbetween lots of muddles

盥から 盥へうつる ちんぷんかん
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-24 13:07 | 翻訳
Gregory Clark, who had been one of appointed
committees and councils (shingikai) set up to consider
nuclear energy policy and nuclear safety, writes on
Japanese mentality--although he calls it "culture"--
which has been so penatrated and with the Fukushima
nuke plant disaster, now we all have to put the mentality
or ourselves in public.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/eo20110324gc.html

The summary of this article or what I call the Japanese "mentality"
and what Clark calls Japanese culture, should be--

Glossy brochures and elaborate public meetings aimed to counter
the strong antinuclear movement in Japan seemed the main objective.
My suggestions that staff who pointed out dangers and lapses
— whistle-blowers as we call them — should be rewarded got
short shrift.

The suggestions were "contrary to the Japanese culture of
enterprise loyalty," I was told bluntly. Pointing out that other
well-known aspect of the same group culture — a tendency to
coverups and complacency — did not seem welcome.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-24 12:33

Roses

How could I forget what I once promised you?
It has been on my mind and in my heart,
For you have been a gem and an angel to me!
When I am back to you, I will bring you some
roses, sweet dark red and white ones mixed
To show you our early love is never meant to die.

d0112879_2259926.jpg

[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-14 22:48 | 読書

A Japanese Rose Kyoka

You must be familiar with senryu.
It is based on haiku form and yet is twisted and deviated;
it is full of wit, irony, satire, cynism, esprit and joke.

If one can have senryu juxtaposed with senrhyu,
why can't one have twisted and deviated 5-7-5-7-7?!

There used to be the time witty and joking tanka was popular.
That was in the Edo Era. They called it "kyoka" 狂歌 literally
means "eccentric songs" or songs of eccentricity and deviation.

If one can have senryu juxtaposed with senrhyu,
why can't one have twisted and deviated 5-7-5-7-7?!

There used to be the time witty and joking tanka was popular.
That was in the Edo Era. They called it "kyoka" 狂歌 literally
means "eccentric songs" or songs of eccentricity and deviation.

Let me introduce you some kyoka poems.

First the original version:

treading through
coloured maples leaves
in the depth of mountain,
when i hear deer cry for doe
how sad autumn makes me feel !

奥山に 紅葉踏み分け 鳴く鹿の
声聞く時ぞ 秋は悲しき

猿丸太夫

one of the kyoka on this poem:

viewing coloured maple leaves
in the deapth of mountain
drinking rice wine
making ourselves merry
how happy autumn makes me feel !

What a shift of emotional change this kyoka makes!

What about the lovely poem on secret love?

my secret love
must be in the air
they ask me
if i have some lady
on my mind.

Taira no Kanemori

しのぶれど 色に出でにけり わが恋(こひ)は

     ものや思ふと 人の問ふまで

                     平兼盛


toothache
day and night
chin in my hands
they ask me
if i am in love

Now you are going to read a kyoka with frog in it!
d0112879_21184588.jpg


春雨の
   ふる日
な可らも山吹の
       ミのひとつ
            たる
         なく蛙菊

So runs the calligraphy. Written in our conventional way, it runs:

春雨のふる日ながらも山吹の実のひとつたる鳴く蛙聞く

harusameno furuhi nagaramo yamabukino minohitotsu taru naku kawazu kiku

spring rain falling today
I hear a frog singing
whose voice is to
suffice to say what
Japanese rose may say

This waka or classic 31 syllable poem has pun in "mi" covering
both fruit and body. We have the famous poem on Japanese rose.
Ohta Dokan wanted to borrow a straw raincoat when it started to rain.

He visited one of the village houses to ask for a straw raincoat.
There came out a young lady with a branch of Japanese rose with
her poem. The poem reads, "Yamabuki no mino hitotsu dani naku
kanashi" or "what a pity that/no fruits for Japanese rose/ no straw
raincoats for me/ to lend to you /but his branch of Japanese rose."

In this poem, the poet has twisted this old poem for Dohkan;
"mino hitotu dani naku" can be deconstucted or punned away with
"with only one body to sing." Thus comes out the poem you
read above!?



This waka or classic 31 syllable poem has pun in "mi" which is to cover

both fruit and body. We have the famous poem on Japanese rose.
Ohta Dokan wanted to borrow a straw raincoat when it started to rain.

He visited one of the village houses to ask for a straw raincoat.
There came out a young lady with a branch of Japanese rose with
her poem. The poem reads, "Yamabuki no mino hitotsu dani naku
kanashi" or "what a pity that/no fruits for Japanese rose/ no straw
raincoats for me/ to lend to you /but his branch of Japanese rose."

In this poem, the poet has twisted this old poem for Dohkan;
"mino hitotu dani naku" can be deconstucted or punned away with
"with only one body to sing." Thus comes out the poem you
read above!?
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2011-03-03 21:15 | 翻訳