日々の読書、愛犬たち、翻訳、手芸など


by ars_maki
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<   2009年 03月 ( 15 )   > この月の画像一覧

Atonement(ita.)

I watched Atonement on YouTube, after I checked Dan Callahan's
comments.

One can get the story line in the Plot when you check with Wikipedia.
However, they seem to have missed the point that Briony also had a
crush on Robbie who loves Cecilia, Briony's sister.

However, the storyline available in Plot in English is too rough to
fathom the plot of Atonement the novel. You must read about
the story in Wikipedia, switching from English to German.
The German Wikipedia lets you know the crucial factors involved with
the rape of Lola as well as why the novel is called Atonement.

In short, Briony, at the end of her sanity---she knows that dementia will
strike her---she is to publish her autobiographical novel, in which she
has tried to tell not only her wrongdoings but also she herself was
betrayed by both Lola and Paul Marshall the raper: they later marry,
leaving Briony the only witness to testify the whole truth or the absolute truth.
d0112879_11293834.jpg

This is the jacket cover for Japanese translation of Atonement.
Here on the cover is marked with "The girl committed the sin,
for she was innocent." This sounds rather absurd, doesn't it?
To refer to a teenager by "innocent" or "innocence,"
one could be too naive, though one might refer to baby
and talk about "innocent," or rather ask oneself
if a baby could be an angel or a devil.

Thanks to the poor output of the Plot available in English Wikipedia,
I've got a chance to check with what theological and other significances
atonement has.
In this case English page is the best, much better than
French or German page.
I'm especially interested in what René Girard says about the notion
of Atonement.

1. mimetic desire: imitation is an aspect of behaviour that not only
affects learning but also desire, and imitated desire is a cause of conflict,
2. the scapegoat mechanism is the origin of sacrifice and the foundation
of human culture, and religion was necessary in human evolution to
control the violence that can come from mimetic rivalry,
3. the Bible reveals the two previous ideas and denounces the scapegoat
mechanism.

I do think and feel this makes me reflect what I've gone through
these few months.

[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-31 11:29 | ネット
Dan Callahan is said to be of The House Next Door,
Slant Magazine and Bright Lights Film Journal.

His commentary sounds interesting.
Do visit YouTube and listen to him making comments on the novel and
the movie, director Joseph Losey, playwright Harold Pinter,
actress Julie Christie, and above all Callahan's comparison between
The Go-Between and Atonement.


Callahan points the narrative aspects
played by Michael Redgrave and Vanessa Redgrave, both of the roles
are too crucial to dismiss.

Here I've just put down "narrative aspects," but Callahan implies the conception
or conceit that has been laid down or embedded by the authors as well as the screen writers.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-29 20:29 | ネット

The Go-Between (ita.)

While writing about The Go-Between I put down
Leonard Bates instead of Leonard Bast.
This is an abusurd mixture: the character in The Go-Between
is Ted Burgess being played by Alan Bates.
The main reason that I confused and mixed up Bast and Bates(the actor
played Ted Burgess) seems to be from my memory about the characters:
both men are from outside their lovers' classes and their ladies
get pregnant, plus Alan Bates looks more attractive than the actor
who played Leonard Bast.

Bast is the man who is killed by Charles Wilcox,
while Ted Burgess (played by Alan Bates) is the farmer who is
in love with Marian Maudsley.
Marian, being in love with Alan, is going to be engaged to Viscount
Hugh Triminghan.

The narrator, Leo Colston comes to know Marian whose brother
is Leo's boarding school peer.

As usual, the story is available in Wikipedia.

The quotation you see at the top of this Wikipedia page:
"The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there."
has an ironical and acid clang, suggesting the demarcative difference
and morality between male and female ie. the one that
is to play acrtive role and the other to play passive role, when it
comes to sexual acts. One might ask oneself whether Alan Bates
should kill himself with a gun if Bates were born much later, let say
at least in 1953 when this novel was firstly published. One asks.
yet again, whether this type of moral issue has nothing to do with
social norms which are accorded with times and places.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-29 15:08 | 読書

letters and classics

As I put down in the topic on Sarah Waters vs Umberto Eco,
there had been, in mixi or my social network service,
an argument going on about whether one should read classics
while one has no way out of one's financial problems
since that one has been in the midst of economical depression
and recession.

After pondering about reading classics or letters,
I was reminded of Howard's End and Jude the Obscure.

The outline of E.M. Foster's movie is available in the synopsis of Wikipedia.

The more or rather the best digest version is available on YouTube
as the trailer of the movie.

At the end of this video clip, Leonard Bast looks like he is
trying to hold back the books falling down over him;
he looks like he will be under the books and the bookshelves.
This seems to suggest and symbolise how futile it has been
for Leonard to be immersed in letters and classics.
Certainly this could be rather too simple-minded conclusion,
for there was Leonard's girlfriend who used to be Henry Wilcox's mistress.
If he had not had her, things might have been pretty different.
However, there could be no ifs in this crux.

The crux must also remind one of Jude the Obscure.
Jude says he was killed by letters.

One of my mixi friends comments that Jude has been driven
by demonic urge for the pursuit of learning and letters.
One has to feel also to ask oneself if Jude might have avoided
the tragedy if he had tried to be free from Arabella as well as Sue.
This is, however, as almost every one knows, in a way,
the dummy question, as evidenced in the introductory
commercial comment to the book on Amazon: "Jude The Obscure,
an almost unbearably sad story about love and sexual desire
mapped into the peculiar English matrixes of class and destiny
in the Victorian 19th century, has come to be recognized as
one of Hardy's most important novels."
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-27 17:27 | 読書

It was raining

when I took out June to walk.

June did not want to go around in the rain.
This was very unusual for we used to walk
when it rained.

June wanted to go home.
d0112879_20295243.jpg


I still wonder what had changed her mind, though.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-25 20:29 | 愛犬

Sarah Waters vs Umberto Eco

Today I read the comments in one of my mixi---
the social network service---community,
where people love reading so-called books of classics
get together and discuss.
They are talking what the use of reading classic books
when we are in recession and depression.

I smiled at myself, for most of the books or classic novels
I've read are rooted in poverty or you can not help feeling
how grave and gruesome poverty could be.

The other day I watched Fingersmith on YouTube.
I ordered the original book after I was moved immensely.
Today I received the book; it only took about a week
to reach me from UK.

d0112879_23202794.jpg


The first page or the Chapter begins like:

My name, in those days, was Susan Trinder. People called me Sue.
I know the year I was born in, but for many years I did not know the date,
and took my birthday at Christmas. I believe I am an orphan. My mother
I know is dead. But I never saw her, she was nothing to me. I was Mrs
Suchsby's child、 if I was anyone's; and for father I had Mr Ibbs, who kept
the locksmith's shop, at Lant Street, in the Borough, near to the Thames.

This is the first time I remember thinking about the world and my place in it.
Threre was a girl named Flora, who paid Mrs Sucksby a penny to take me
begging at a play. People used to like to take me begging then, for the sake
of my bright hair; and Flora being also very fair, she would pass me off
as her sister. The Theatre she took me to, on the night I am thinking of
now, was the Surrey, St George's Circus. The play was Oliver Twist.
I remember it as very terrible. I remember the tilt of the gallery, and the
drop of the pit. I remember a drunken woman catching at the ribbons of
my dress. I remember the flares, that made the stage very lurid; and the
roaring of the actors, the shrieking of the crowd. They had one of the
characters in a red wig and whiskers: I was certain he was a monkey
in a coat, he capered so. Worse still was the snarling, pink-eyed dog;
worst of all was that dog's master---Bill Sykes, the fancy-man.
When he struck the poor girl Nancy with his club, the people all down
our row got up. There was a boot thrown at the stage. A woman
beside me cried out,
'Oh, you beast! You villain! And her worth forty of a bully like you!'

Doesn't this remind you of the beginning of The Great Expectations, ?!

MY father's family name being Pirrip, and my christian name Philip,
my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or
more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.
I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone
and my sister - Mrs Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never
saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them
(for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies
regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their
tombstones.

The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that
he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character
and turn of the inscription, `Also Georgiana Wife of the Above,' I drew
a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly. To five little
stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long, which were arranged
in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of
five little brothers of mine - who gave up trying to get a living,
exceedingly early in that universal struggle - I am indebted for a belief
I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs
with their hands in their trousers- pockets, and had never taken them
out in this state of existence.

Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river
wound, twenty miles of the sea. My first most vivid and broad
impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been
gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place
overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip,
late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead
and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias,
and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried;
and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected
with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it,
was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river;
and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing,
was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it
all and beginning to cry, was Pip.

`Hold your noise!' cried a terrible voice, as a man started up from
among the graves at the side of the church porch. `Keep still,
you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!'

Some people, especially librarians, who are busy sorting out
new books, may wonder if their newly-arrived books would
survive and become classics in half a century.

Somehow I feel Fingersmith will be a classic some time,
while the next book, whose protagonist has lost his memory
about himself, but never about books, won't make it.

d0112879_2339661.jpg

[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-23 23:19 | 読書

古典

mixiのコミュに「古典を読もう」というのがある。
そこで、かねてから論じられているのは、「こんな不況の御時勢に
古典を読んで何になるのか?」、「生産性はあるのか?」という議論。

「えっ?!生産性って?」、「役に立つって?」とすぐに思った。
すぐには恐らく、生産性にも結びつかないだろうし、役にも立ちそうもない
古典の読書。

「この不況の御時勢」というのに苦笑してしまった。
私が読む古典ものは貧しい、不況の御時勢のものが多いからだ。

先日、YouTubeで2日間にわたって楽しんだFingersmith
『荊の城』。矢張り、原作も読みたいと思い注文。今日、届いてた!?
余りの速さにビックリ。

d0112879_19582174.jpg


第1章の冒頭はこんな感じ。

My name, in those days, was Susan Trinder. People called me Sue.
I know the year I was born in, but for many years I did not know the date,
and took my birthday at Christmas. I believe I am an orphan. My mother
I know is dead. But I never saw her, she was nothing to me. I was Mrs
Suchsby's child、 if I was anyone's; and for father I had Mr Ibbs, who kept
the locksmith's shop, at Lant Street, in the Borough, near to the Thames.

This is the first time I remember thinking about the world and my place in it.
Threre was a girl named Flora, who paid Mrs Sucksby a penny to take me
begging at a play. People used to like to take me begging then, for the sake
of my bright hair; and Flora being also very fair, she would pass me off
as her sister. The Theatre she took me to, on the night I am thinking of
now, was the Surrey, St George's Circus. The play was Oliver Twist.
I remember it as very terrible. I remember the tilt of the gallery, and the
drop of the pit. I remember a drunken woman catching at the ribbons of
my dress. I remember the flares, that made the stage very lurid; and the
roaring of the actors, the shrieking of the crowd. They had one of the
characters in a red wig and whiskers: I was certain he was a monkey
in a coat, he capered so. Worse still was the snarling, pink-eyed dog;
worst of all was that dog's master---Bill Sykes, the fancy-man.
When he struck the poor girl Nancy with his club, the people all down
our row got up. There was a boot thrown at the stage. A woman
beside me cried out,
'Oh, you beast! You villain! And her worth forty of a bully like you!'

これは主人公のスーザンが自分の生い立ちを語っているところ。
すりを生業にして、というより育ての親であるサクスビー夫人に
させられていることが窺われる。サリー座という安い芝居小屋に
フローラと一緒に小銭をせびりに行く。何のことはない、すりに行くのだ!?
スーザンもフローラも可愛くて、姉妹で通ってしまう。
その夜、サリー座では『オリヴァー・ツイスト』を興行中。

最大のハイライトであるビル・サイクスが恋人のナンシーを傷めつける
ところでは、思わず観客たちも総立ちになり、「人でなし!この悪党!」
などという怒号がどよめく。

このハイライトは、原作者自身の講読会の演目の目玉だった。
原作者チャールズ・ディケンズ自身、迫真の演技で命を縮めた
と言われている。

このSarah Water著『荊の城』の出だしは、The Great Expectations
の出だしを彷彿とさせる。


MY father's family name being Pirrip, and my christian name Philip,
my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or
more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.
I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone
and my sister - Mrs Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never
saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them
(for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies
regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their
tombstones.

The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that
he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character
and turn of the inscription, `Also Georgiana Wife of the Above,' I drew
a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly. To five little
stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long, which were arranged
in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of
five little brothers of mine - who gave up trying to get a living,
exceedingly early in that universal struggle - I am indebted for a belief
I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs
with their hands in their trousers- pockets, and had never taken them
out in this state of existence.

Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within, as the river
wound, twenty miles of the sea. My first most vivid and broad
impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been
gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place
overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip,
late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead
and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias,
and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried;
and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected
with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it,
was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river;
and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing,
was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it
all and beginning to cry, was Pip.

`Hold your noise!' cried a terrible voice, as a man started up from
among the graves at the side of the church porch. `Keep still,
you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!'

この冒頭は有名なので、説明は不要だと思うが、主人公のピップこと
フィリップが脱走してきた囚人、後の恩人と出遭う場面。ピップにヤスリと
食物を持ってこさせ、イギリスからオーストラリアに渡り、羊飼いで成功。
ピップに毎年500万円ほど送金。ピップを紳士に仕立て上げてしまう!?

オーストラリアのメル友は図書館司書。新書を注文して棚に並べ、すぐに
分かるようにしている。スーパーの商品整理と変わらない気がするという。
新しい本が半世紀後「古典」として残っているかどうか、整理しながら思う
そうだ。Fingersmithは古典の一冊になるのだろうか。
なりそうな気がする。

それと比べてこの本。
d0112879_21154211.jpg


ウンベルト・エーコの自分のことに関する記憶は
喪失してしまったのに、本のことなどはしっかり
憶えている主人公が読書家たちに贈った一冊。
古典覚書といったところか。
これは古典には残らない気がする。
『薔薇の名前』が残るだけで充分だという気もする。
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-23 20:23 | 読書

A lovely day for riding around

This afternoon I went out on my bicylce.
As usual to the river bank and then onto the cycling alley
or the course we have in the city along the river bank.

d0112879_1820522.jpg

Just a part of it. The crouse has curves and slopes,
so you have to be careful, minding if anybody is coming
towards you, especially around curves and on the slopes,
you have to watch out, trying not to be absent-minded
being absorbed with some scenery or airbaloons,
or men in the sky.

d0112879_18231791.jpg

However, you can also take a break when cats come
around and stand in your way!?

d0112879_182524100.jpg

There used to be rapeflowers blooming around this time
of the year. But it seemed to have no flowers in the field.

d0112879_1827323.jpg

The news says cherry blossoms started to bloom in Tokyo,
but not in our city. Some apricot blossoms have started to
come out.

d0112879_1829064.jpg

This was what I had when I came back, dropping in at
my Italian cafe restaurant.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-21 18:32 | 季節

Little Dorrit

I thought we could watch Little Dorrit on YouTube.
I hit two versions; one in 1988 and the other possibly in 2008.

Here is the 1988 version.

In the latest version---there is the German film in 1934!---
Claire Foy plays Amy Dorrit. She says Amy's mother dies
when Amy is little. This is not, however, true; the mother
dies after delivering the baby or Amy. You can tell this by
the video clip I've just posted.

Claire Foy is encahnting or simply charming as you can see in this video clip.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-17 20:09 | ネット
In Wittgenstein's Vienna the narrator---Michael Woods---quotes this
as one of Wittgenstein's enigmatic statements. It would not be
enigmatic when you finish watching the video clips of Fingersmith
that are available on YouTube. No doubt the statement, however,
does tell Wittgenstein's way of living and thinking.

Those of you who are familiar with Dickens or Dickensian world
must feel at home with the background of Fingersmith.

We find Wittgenstein and Russell discussing David Copperfield.
We wonder how come Wittgenstein came to read Dickens,
while we have the impression that he only read detective novels;
one or he might read Dickens as detective story, though.
Paul Wittgenstein read Dickens, not to mention classic Latin authors.
It could be that Paul had left his brother recommending comments
on Charles Dickens.
[PR]
by ars_maki | 2009-03-16 09:58 | ネット